Feminism Six Citations, Six Stories

There are a few feminist quotes are entered into in the history of the world. But what’s really behind it? Six quotes – six stories.

“Ain’t I a woman?” (Sojourner Truth, 1851)

“I’m about no woman?” asked the American abolitionist (i.e. slavery opponent) and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth in her famous speech from 1951. But: she asked really? Two versions are circulating of this speech. The one published in June 1851 in the anti-slavery Bugle. The phrase “Ain’t I a woman?” it does not appear. In the version by Frances Dana Barker Gage, published 12 years later, it is however. Gage himself in feminist mission, generously supplemented the original speech and missed her a stereotypical southern dialect. Sojourner Truth but came from Upstate New York and grew up with Dutch as a first language. In Gages version Sojourner Truth used the phrase “Ain’t I a woman?”, to demand equal rights: women apply as physically weak. She, (her slave name was “Isabella”) was the slave of truth through the hard work on the farm but strong like a man – and won a woman. No one knows the exact wording of Sojourner truths speech today. She was at that time still a sensation, because truth was the link between sexism and racism as one of the first.

“Deeds not words!” (British suffragettes, 1912)

For many years, the British suffragettes had peacefully fought for women’s suffrage. It did is: nothing. So the women from 1912 on militant methods resorted. They chained themselves to railway tracks, threw a window and put boxes on fire. The suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst, Chair of the women’s social and political Union (WSPU) wrote in 1913 in a letter to the members of the WSPU: “to be militant in some ways is a moral bond [a duty].” Every woman owes this to her own conscience and self-respect, and to future generations of women. […] Peaceful methods fail.” The suffragettes were regularly arrested for their militant actions – even in prison they continued their protest and joined in the hunger strike. Most of all, Emily Davison, who in 1913 came under the King’s horse at the races in Epsom was: a sash in the colours of suffragists you probably wanted to put the horse. The horse fell and Davison suffered severe injuries, where she later died. Today, it is not entirely clear whether it was planned as a suicide – Davison was revered as a martyr after her death by the suffragettes.

“One is not born a woman, one is there.” (Simone de Beauvoir, 1949)

One of the most famous feminist quotes – which was mistranslated but long time in Germany. “On ne naît pas femme, on le devient”, was so from the French original: “one is not born a woman, one is made to do so.” So it sounds but then something would get done on women. Beauvoir, however, stressed the process of becoming of woman: the learning of certain rituals, the insertion in the role of women. Something in which women are even quite involved. Womanhood, which is final, Beauvoir is nothing natural, biological, but some raised.

“The personal is political.” (Second wave of the feminist movement, 70s)

In the 1960s, women began to meet to discuss their private problems in consciousness raising groups. It was about relationships, motherhood, violence, and about to resolve the dividing line between “private” and “public”. The realization was namely: personal experiences where you attach no political or social importance, are actually part of a larger pattern. It’s called “Politics of first-person”. The slogan “The personal is political” is also an invitation to leave are not separate. And who once has sharpened the look for injustices in the personal environment, this notice which also on a social level. Inequalities in private are an expression of a deeply-rooted, which comprises all areas of social life and control suppression system.

“A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle.” (Irina Dunn, 1970)

Which fish needs a bike already? Exactly. And nor do women need men. The set is of course exaggerated formulated and is fun, that women need men allegedly more than vice versa. Long time slogan of the American feminist Gloria Steinem was attributed to – until they made it clear that the author was not her, but the Australian journalist and politician Irina Dunn. Dunn had invented the slogan as a student in 1970. Dunn himself said: “I distinguished a set that I read in a philosophical text (…). He was ‘ A man needs God like a fish needs a bicycle.’ My inspiration was therefore that I was active in the resurgent women’s movement and therefore I was a smart electronic. “I scribbled the set on the backgrounds of two toilet doors, one at Sydney University, where I was a student, and the other at Soren’s wine bar in Woolloomooloo, a dodgy suburban Sydney.”

“When we don’t pay attention to the margins, when we do not acknowledge the intersection, where the places of power overlap, we not only fail to see the women who fall between our movements, [but] sometimes we pit our movements against each other.” (Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, 1994)

The term “Intersectionality” belongs today to the feminist mainstream. It concerns the fact that it can overlap multiple forms of discrimination in a person. The term in the 1980s was introduced by the African-American law professor Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw. You noticed that the anti-discrimination legislation gender and race often separated from each other be regarded as discrimination may relate only to one of them. in 1991, Crenshaw was part of Anita hills legal representation: Hill accused Clarence Thomas, candidate for a seat in the Supreme Court, to have sexually harassed them. Both were African American applicant as also defendant and Crenshaw was interested in watching the various dynamics: white feminists struck across the hills, many in the African-American community but supported Thomas. Crenshaw noted that Hill, by she unconsciously decided to represent their cause in this case as a woman, hearing was at the same time not more than African-American women.

 

Gallery

38 best Villfarelser images on Pinterest

38 best Villfarelser images on Pinterest

Source: www.pinterest.com

Best comeback punch (not to advocate violence, but it sure …

Best comeback punch (not to advocate violence, but it sure ...

Source: www.pinterest.com

Denmark’s new feminist party declares, ‘Out with the …

Denmark's new feminist party declares, 'Out with the ...

Source: www.pri.org

37 best am I a feminist? images on Pinterest

37 best am I a feminist? images on Pinterest

Source: www.pinterest.com

148 best images about FEMINISM! because it matters! on …

148 best images about FEMINISM! because it matters! on ...

Source: www.pinterest.com

for more inspiration visit evelyneloraine.com …

for more inspiration visit evelyneloraine.com ...

Source: www.pinterest.com

Best 20+ Gender equality quotes ideas on Pinterest …

Best 20+ Gender equality quotes ideas on Pinterest ...

Source: www.pinterest.com

148 best images about FEMINISM! because it matters! on …

148 best images about FEMINISM! because it matters! on ...

Source: www.pinterest.com

Best 25+ Tumblr posts ideas on Pinterest

Best 25+ Tumblr posts ideas on Pinterest

Source: www.pinterest.com

This Comic Perfectly Captures How Feminism Helps Everyone …

This Comic Perfectly Captures How Feminism Helps Everyone ...

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Citations en …

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Citations en ...

Source: www.pinterest.fr

902 best Women’s Rights

902 best Women's Rights

Source: www.pinterest.com

Pin by Ambrose Miller on sentences/citations

Pin by Ambrose Miller on sentences/citations

Source: www.pinterest.com

"God put us here on this carnival ride" — whoneedsfeminism …

"God put us here on this carnival ride" — whoneedsfeminism ...

Source: carries-carnival-ride.tumblr.com

What does ‘feminism’ mean? Merriam-Webster says …

What does 'feminism' mean? Merriam-Webster says ...

Source: www.usatoday.com

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Citations sur le …

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Citations sur le ...

Source: www.pinterest.fr

3 Ways to Cite a Short Story

3 Ways to Cite a Short Story

Source: www.wikihow.com

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Harriet beecher …

Les 25 meilleures idées de la catégorie Harriet beecher ...

Source: www.pinterest.fr

MLA Citation

MLA Citation

Source: www.slideshare.net

After the Women’s March, Advice for Staying Involved

After the Women's March, Advice for Staying Involved

Source: www.glamour.com